The seroprevalence of untreated chronic hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection and associated risk factors in male irish prisoners: A cross-sectional study, 2017

default

The seroprevalence of untreated chronic hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection and associated risk factors in male irish prisoners: A cross-sectional study, 2017

Authors

Crowley, D.,Lambert, J. S.,Betts-Symonds, G.,Cullen, W.,Keevans, M.,Kelly, E.,Laird, E.,McHugh, T.,McKiernan, S.,Miggin, S. J.,Murphy, C.,Murtagh, R.,O'Reilly, D.,Tobin, C.,Van Hout, M. C.

Citation
Eurosurveillance

24

14
Type
Cross-sectional
Virus targets
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis C
Other targets
HIV
Interventions
HBV testing and linkage to care
HCV testing and linkage to Care
Linkage to care
Screening and diagnosis
Testing
Setting
National
Target populations
Incarcerated populations (current and former)
Country of development
Ireland
Target location
Ireland
DOI
10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2019.24.14.1800369
Testing strategy
Laboratory-based antibody test
Laboratory-based HCV core antigen (cAg) confirmatory test
Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test
Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test
Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based HCV core antigen (cAg) confirmatory test
Countries of included studies
Ireland

Health outcomes

Linkage to care

Testing strategy

Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test,Laboratory-based HCV core antigen (cAg) confirmatory test

Abstract

Introduction: Data on chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection prevalence in European prisons are incomplete and impact the public health opportunity that incarceration provides. Aim(s): We aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of untreated chronic HCV infection and to identify associated risk factors in an Irish male prison. Method(s): We conducted a cross-sectional study involving a researcher-administered questionnaire, review of medical records and HCV serology. Result(s): Of 422 prisoners (78.0% of the study popula-tion) who participated in the study, 298 (70.6%) completed the questionnaire and 403 (95.5%) were tested for HCV antibodies. Of those tested, 92 (22.8%) were HCV antibody-positive, and of those, 53 (57.6%) were HCV RNA-positive, 23 (25.0%) had spontaneous clearance, 16 (17.4%) had a sustained viral response, 10 (11.0%) were co-infected with HIV and six (6.0%) with HBV. The untreated chronic HCV seroprevalence estimate was 13.1% and the seroprevalence of HCV among prisoners with a history of injecting drug use (IDU) was 79.7%. Risk factors significantly associated with past HCV infection were IDU (p < 0.0001), having received a prison tattoo (p < 0.0001) or a non-sterile community tattoo (p < 0.0001), sharing needles and other drug-taking paraphernalia (p < 0.0001). Small numbers of prisoners had a history of sharing razors (n=10; 3.4%) and toothbrushes (n=3; 1.0%) while incarcerated. On multivariable analysis, history of receiving a non-sterile community tattoo was the only significant risk factor associated with HCV acquisition (after IDU was removed from the model) (p = 0.005, beta = 0.468). Conclusion(s): The level of untreated chronic HCV infection in Irish prisons is high, with IDU the main associated risk. Copyright © 2019, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). All rights reserved.

Page updated

22 Jan 2021