Screening and prevention of infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants. Integrating hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV screening into tuberculosis entry screening for migrants in the Netherlands, 2013 to 2015

default

Screening and prevention of infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants. Integrating hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV screening into tuberculosis entry screening for migrants in the Netherlands, 2013 to 2015

Authors

Bil, J. P.,Schrooders, P. A. G.,Prins, M.,Kouw, P. M.,Klomp, J. H. E.,Scholing, M.,Huijbregts, L. P. H. M.,Sonder, G. J. B.,Waegemaekers, T. C. H. F. M.,de Vries, H. J. C.,Meijer, W.,Zuure, F. R.,Tostmann, A.

Citation
2018
Eurosurveillance

23

11
17-00491
Type
Cross-sectional
Virus targets
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis C
Other targets
HIV
Interventions
HBV testing and linkage to care
HCV testing and linkage to Care
Linkage to care
Screening and diagnosis
Testing
Setting
National
Target populations
Immigrants/Refugees
Country of development
Netherlands
Target location
Netherlands
DOI
10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2018.23.11.17-00491
Testing strategy
Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test
Laboratory-based antibody test
Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test
Countries of included studies
Netherlands

Health outcomes

Number new diagnoses,Linkage to care

Testing strategy

Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test

Abstract

We evaluated uptake and diagnostic outcomes of voluntary hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus (HCV) screening offered during routine tuberculosis entry screening to migrants in Gelderland and Amsterdam, the Netherlands, between 2013 and 2015. In Amsterdam, HIV screening was also offered. Overall, 54% (461/859) accepted screening. Prevalence of chronic HBV infection (HBsAg-positive) and HCV exposure (anti-HCVpositive) in Gelderland was 4.48% (9/201; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.37-8.29) and 0.99% (2/203; 95% CI: 0.27-3.52), respectively, all infections were newly diagnosed. Prevalence of chronic HBV infection, HCV exposure and chronic HCV infection (HCV RNA-positive) in Amsterdam was 0.39% (1/256; 95% CI: 0.07-2.18), 1.17% (3/256; 95% CI: 0.40-3.39) and 0.39% (1/256; 95% CI: 0.07-2.18), respectively, with all chronic HBV/HCV infections previously diagnosed. No HIV infections were found. In univariate analyses, newly diagnosed chronic HBV infection was more likely in participants migrating for reasons other than work or study (4.35% vs 0.83%; odds ratio (OR) = 5.45; 95% CI: 1.12-26.60) and was less likely in participants in Amsterdam than Gelderland (0.00% vs 4.48%; OR = 0.04; 95% CI: 0.00-0.69). Regional differences in HBV prevalence might be explained by differences in the populations entering compulsory tuberculosis screening. Prescreening selection of migrants based on risk factors merits further exploration. Copyright © 2018, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). All rights reserved.

Page updated

21 Jan 2021