Laboratory screening for children entering foster care

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Laboratory screening for children entering foster care

Authors

Greiner, M. V.,Beal, S. J.,Nause, K.,Staat, M. A.,Dexheimer, J. W.,Scribano, P. V.

Citation
2017
Pediatrics

140

6 (e20163778)
Type
Retrospective cohort
Virus targets
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis C
Other targets
HIV
Interventions
Screening and diagnosis
Testing
Setting
National
Target populations
Adolescents (10 - 19 years of age)
Young Adults <21
Country of development
United States of America
Target location
United States of America
DOI
10.1542/peds.2016-3778
Testing strategy
Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test
Laboratory-based antibody test
Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test
Countries of included studies
United States of America

Health outcomes

Number new diagnoses

Testing strategy

Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of medical illness detected by laboratory screening in children entering foster care in a single, urban county. METHOD(S): All children entering foster care in a single county in Ohio were seen at a consultation foster care clinic and had laboratory screening, including testing for infectious diseases such as HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, syphilis, and tuberculosis as well as for hemoglobin and lead levels. RESULT(S): Over a 3-year period (2012-2015), laboratory screening was performed on 1977 subjects entering foster care in a consultative foster care clinic. The prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, syphilis, and tuberculosis were all found to be <1%. There were no cases of HIV. Seven percent of teenagers entering foster care tested positive for Chlamydia. A secondary finding was that 54% of subjects were hepatitis B surface antibody-negative, indicating an absence of detected immunity to the hepatitis B virus. CONCLUSION(S): Routine laboratory screening for children entering foster care resulted in a low yield. Targeted, rather than routine, laboratory screening may be a more clinically meaningful approach for children entering foster care. © Copyright 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Page updated

22 Jan 2021