Elimination of hepatitis C virus infection in patients with haemophilia in Belgium: A single-centre experience

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Elimination of hepatitis C virus infection in patients with haemophilia in Belgium: A single-centre experience

Authors

Fransen, L.,D'Hondt, P.,Bielen, R.,Van den Ende, N.,Robaeys, G.,Peerlinck, K.,Nevens, F.

Citation
2019
Haemophilia

25

6
1028-1034
Type
Retrospective cohort
Virus targets
Hepatitis C
Interventions
HCV testing and linkage to Care
Linkage to care
Screening and diagnosis
Testing
Setting
National
Target populations
Individuals with blood disorders
Country of development
Belgium
Target location
Belgium
DOI
10.1111/hae.13829
Testing strategy
Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test
Laboratory-based antibody test
Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test
Countries of included studies
Belgium

Health outcomes

Linkage to care

Testing strategy 

Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test

Abstract

Introduction: Patients with haemophilia are one of the subgroups with a high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. They are a potential target group to eliminate HCV infection thanks to the availability of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy. Aim(s): To investigate the results of DAA therapy in a cohort of patients with bleeding disorders. Method(s): This retrospective study was conducted between July 2018 and April 2019. All patients born before 1990 with haemophilia, von Willebrand factor Disease, factor V deficiency, factor VII deficiency or afibrinogenemia were included in this study. Result(s): Of 299 patients, 297 (99.3%) were tested for HCV antibody presence and 211 (71.0%) were positive. Of these, 205 (97.1%) were tested for HCV RNA and 153 (72.1%) were chronically infected. In total, 127 (83.0%) received antiviral therapy, and 110 (71.8%) patients were cured by antiviral treatment. The presence of cirrhosis was significantly higher in patients without a cure for HCV infection when compared to patients who achieved sustained virologic response by treatment or never infected (32.6% vs. 12.8% vs. 0%; P <.001). At the end of follow-up in 2019, only 14 (9.1%) patients had a remaining HCV infection. Ten (71.4%) were lost to follow-up, one (7.1%) patient refused, two (14.2%) had comorbidities and one (7.1%) will start treatment soon. Conclusion(s): In this cohort, the elimination targets for HCV infection in 2030 as proposed by the World Health Organization were already reached. Nevertheless, in order to cure every patient, monitoring tools are necessary. Copyright © 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Page updated

22 Jan 2021