Cascade of care for migrants tested Hepatitis C antibodies positive in France through a systematic screening programme: The PRECAVIR study

default

Cascade of care for migrants tested Hepatitis C antibodies positive in France through a systematic screening programme: The PRECAVIR study

Authors

Rosa-Hezode, I.,Chousterman, M.,Costes, L.,Labourdette, C.,Elghozi, B.,Krastinova, E.,Roudot-Thoraval, F.

Citation
2019
Journal of Viral Hepatitis

26

12
1496-1499
Type
Prospective cohort
Virus targets
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis C
Other targets
HIV
Interventions
HBV testing and linkage to care
HCV testing and linkage to Care
Linkage to care
Screening and diagnosis
Testing
Setting
National
Target populations
Immigrants/Refugees
Country of development
France
Target location
France
DOI
10.14218/JCTH.2018.00063
Testing strategy
Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test
Laboratory-based antibody test
Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test
Countries of included studies
France

Health outcomes

Receipt of antibody results,Linkage to care,Loss to follow-up cascade

Testing strategy

Laboratory-based antibody test,Laboratory-based PCR/RNA (confirmatory) test

Abstract

Migration of people from HCV endemic countries is a public health issue for the French healthcare system. The PRECAVIR study focused on migrant patients and provides a multidisciplinary, patient-centred approach to treat chronic HCV-infected migrants through a systematic screening programme. Between 2007 and 2017, 101 (2.98%) out of 3386 consecutive adult migrants attending two primary healthcare settings in Creteil, France, tested positive for HCV. The median age was 44.5 years old, and 55% were women. Patients were mainly from sub-Saharan Africa, Eastern Europe and Asia. Seventy-four patients were undocumented migrants, and 25 were asylum seekers. Eighty-four (83%) patients were unaware of their serological status. All patients were offered referral to a specialist in the same setting. HCV RNA testing was performed in 88 (87%) of the patients who tested anti-HCV positive. Forty-nine (57%) were chronically infected, while 39 (43%) had an undetectable viral load. All patients were treatment-naive. More than half of patients had access to treatment. Before 2014, thirteen patients were treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, and an SVR was achieved in 8 (61.5%) of them. By 2017, 17 patients had begun oral, direct-acting antiviral treatment. An SVR was achieved in 16 of 17 patients (93%). However, all patients not initially eligible for treatment were lost to follow-up. This study showed the effectiveness of a coordinated care network when anti-HCV testing, linkage to care and treatment are organized for a migrant population in the same setting as long as universal treatment makes a test and treat policy possible. Copyright © 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Page updated

22 Jan 2021